Apple Trees By Pollination Type

Apple Trees

Apple Trees by Pollination Type

If you’re new to fruit, you might not know that most apple trees require pollination from at least one other apple tree variety (you won’t have much success if you try to pollinate a Red Delicious with another Red Delicious!) This is known as cross pollination. Some apples, such as Fuji and Gala, are good pollinators and will play nicely with almost any other variety. Others, such as Gravenstein and Mutsu, are poor pollinators.
To get you started, we’ve highlighted some of our apple varieties that require cross pollination in order to produce fruit. Simply choose two compatible varieties and let bees do the hard work!

Cross-Pollinating Apple Trees

Some apple varieties are partially self-pollinating. This means that they can produce some fruit without being pollinated by a similar variety. However, you shouldn’t expect a large fruit yield from these trees on their own. For best results, you’ll still want to pollinate them. You’ll get more fruit for your efforts!
Below are three of the most popular partially self-pollinating apple varieties.

Fuji Apple

Malus domestica ‘Fuji’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate Fuji include Gala, Honeycrisp, Jonathan, Granny Smith, McIntosh, Pink Lady, Red Delicious, and Gold Delicious.

Gravenstein Apple

Malus domestica ‘Gravenstein’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate Gravenstein include Fuji, Gala, Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, McIntosh, and Pink Lady.

Honeycrisp Apple

Malus domestica ‘Honeycrisp’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate Honeycrisp include Fuji, Gala, Granny Smith, Jonathan, McIntosh, Pink Lady, Red Delicious, and Gold Delicious.

Red Delicious Apple

Malus domestica ‘Red Delicious’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate Red Delicious include Pink Lady, Golden Delicious, Fuji, Gala, Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Jonathan, and McIntosh.

McIntosh Apple

Malus domestica ‘McIntosh’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate McIntosh include Pink Lady, Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Fuji, Gala, and Jonathan.

Partially Self-Pollinating Apples

Some apple varieties are partially self-pollinating. This means that they can produce some fruit without being pollinated by a similar variety. However, you shouldn’t expect a large fruit yield from these trees on their own. For best results, you’ll still want to pollinate them. You’ll get more fruit for your efforts!
Below are three of the most popular partially self-pollinating apple varieties.

Gala Apple

Malus domestica ‘Gala’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate Gala include Granny Smith, Jonathan, Honeycrisp, McIntosh, Pink Lady, Red Delicious, and Golden Delicious.

Granny Smith Apple

Malus domestica ‘Granny Smith’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate Granny Smith include Fuji, Gala, Honeycrisp, Golden Delicious, Jonathan, McIntosh, Pink Lady, and Red Delicious.

Golden Delicious Apple

MMalus domestica ‘Golden Delicious’

The most common apple varieties that can pollinate Golden Delicious include Granny Smith, Red Delicious, McIntosh, Pink Lady, Jonathan, Gala, and Fuji.