Red Jewel Crabapple Tree
Red Jewel Crabapple Leaf
Red Jewel Crabapple Additional Product Shot 566
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Red Jewel Crabapple Tree
Red Jewel Crabapple Leaf
Red Jewel Crabapple Additional Product Shot 566

Growth Facts

  • Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Spacing: 10-12'
  • Exposure: Full Sun
  • Show more ›
Red Jewel Crabapple
Malus x 'Red Jewel'

This Tree is not available for Sale at this time through Bower & Branch. Bower & Branch provides this information for reference only. Please check back with us or contact us for more detail.

Red Jewel Crabapple is a delightful small ornamental tree you can depend on for scads of ruby-red fruits to brighten the darkest winter days. This time-tested Crab tree consistently sets generous crops of fruit that cling to the branches well into the winter, decorating the tree and your landscape with pretty jewel-tone ornaments. If other food sources are available, birds may even leave the little crabapples alone almost until the cycle begins again in spring with sparkling white flowers galore. Adaptable and easy to grow, Red Jewel is a smart choice for city garden and performs well in clay soil (provided there is good drainage). It's small enough to plant under power lines, too.

 

Growth Facts

  • Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Spacing: 10-12'
  • Exposure: Full Sun
  • Show more ›

The Story

Red Jewel Crabapple was a product of the Cole Nursery Company of Circleville, Ohio, near Columbus. Cole Nursery was a power player in the nursery industry in its day, but is now defunct.  They’re best remembered for their Honeylocust selections that still corner that market:  ‘Imperial,’ ‘Skyline,’ and ‘Sunburst.’  Red Jewel Crab was hybridized by the company’s owner, Bill Collins, in 1971.  It’s still a popular choice.  It has good resistance to the diseases that affect Crabapples, and it has the BEST fruit retention of any Crab you can buy.

The Details

This dapper little flowering tree makes a worthy addition to your wildlife-friendly garden. The fragrant white flowers keep honeybees and other pollinators busy in spring, and if Red Jewel's crabapples are ignored by winter-resident birds, then migrating songbirds returning North will gladly eat them up.

 

How to Grow

Flowering Crabapples grow well in a wide range of soil conditions and should be planted in a sunny area of your yard; they can tolerate very light shade as well. As with all trees, keep your newly planted Crabapple watered. Don’t keep the soil too wet, however, moist soil is fine. Crabapples also like fertilizer, the more you give them – the more they grow. Once a year apply a simple tree fertilizer during fall to help promote new growth and flowers for the following season. Pruning Flowering Crabapples is fairly easy. Prune branches after your Crabapple is done flowering and cut off any suckers around the base of your tree whenever they appear.

More Info

Cold Tolerance/Hardiness Zone 4
Heat Tolerance/Hardiness Zone 8
Exposure Full Sun
Avg Mature Height 15'
Avg Mature Width 12'
Spacing 10-12'
Growth Rate Medium
Leaf Color Green
Fall Leaf Color Yellow
Flower Color White
Flower Time Spring
Fruit Color Red
Fruit Time Fall
Cary Award Winner No
PA Gold Medal Award No
Attractive Bark No
Attracts Birds Yes
Attracts Butterflies No
Attracts Hummingbirds Yes
Attracts Pollinators No
Deer Resistant No
Drought Tolerant Yes
Dry, Poor Soils Yes
Edible Fruit No
Fragrant Yes
Groundcover No
Hedge/Windbreak No
Native No
Salt Tolerance/Seashore Yes
Seasonal Cut Branches No
Shade Tolerance No
Showy Flowers Yes
Specimen Yes
Urban Conditions Yes
Utility Line Trees Yes
Wet Moist Soils No
Winter Interest Yes
Woodland Garden No
Decor/Craft Use No

Size Guide

Size Guide Scale

Scale

Size: B

Size B

This graphic shows the approximate size and form of the Tree you are viewing.

Size B Trees:

6-8' tall. Grown and shipped in our #15 tree container. Well developed canopy and branching structure. Strong stem caliper to 1 1/2".

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Red Jewel Crabapple Tree
Red Jewel Crabapple Leaf
Red Jewel Crabapple Additional Product Shot 566