Audubon® Common Hackberry Tree
Audubon® Common Hackberry Leaf
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Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 2430
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 1847
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 1846
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 3082
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Audubon® Common Hackberry Tree
Audubon® Common Hackberry Leaf
video screenshot
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 2430
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 1847
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 1846
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 3082

Growth Facts

  • Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Spacing: 50-60'
  • Exposure: Full Sun to Part Shade
  • Deer Resistant: Yes
  • Show more ›

Audubon® Common Hackberry

Celtis occidentalis
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How large is this tree? View the Size Guide.

We currently do not deliver to your area at this time, please contact us to discuss other options.

The reason that Common Hackberry is common is because birds love it so much. Cedar Waxwings, American Robins, mockingbirds, titmice, orioles, and cardinals eat the sweet fruits and then spread the hard, indigestible seeds far and wide. It pops up in forests and wild spaces all over the Midwest and eastern states. Caterpillar-eating birds such as bluebirds and warblers like Common Hackberry, too, for the wide array of moths and butterflies it hosts. And, many birds like it as a tree to nest in. Shouldn’t such a beloved tree be in your backyard bird garden?

May Benefit & Attract: Thrushes, waxwings, mockingbirds, titmice, cardinals, and warblers

Take Birds Under Your Wing

New! Introducing our bird-friendly collection of Audubon® Native Plants & Trees

  • Better for Birds, 100% Neonic-Free
  • Not Available in non-native regions, states or counties (see Native Regions map)

Bower & Branch is proud to grow Audubon® Native Plants for Birds in partnership with the National Audubon Society to help birds and other wildlife thrive.

  • The National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow
  • This bird-friendly native plant provides food and shelter for local and migrating birds and other wildlife
  • Your purchase and planting of this native flora directly supports Audubon’s conservation mission and impact
  • Learn how you can help birds in your home and community through Audubon’s Plants for Birds program
  • Audubon Native Plants & Trees are free of neonicotinoids and exclusively grown by Bower & Branch

Audubon® is a licensed and registered trademark of the National Audubon Society. All rights reserved.

  • Size AA (2-3' tall) container grown 
  • Size A (5-6' tall) container grown
  • Size B (7-8' tall) container grown 
  • Size C (9-10' tall) container grown

Growth Facts

  • Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Spacing: 50-60'
  • Exposure: Full Sun to Part Shade
  • Deer Resistant: Yes
  • Show more ›

Recommended by Our Growers

The Story

Common Hackberry happily inhabits all sorts of wild spaces from Texas to North Carolina and north into Canada. It thrives in forests and on prairies and riverbanks, and it gets along well even on rocky outcroppings. Wildlife flock to it. In early fall, the purple-brown fruits, which are sweet like raisins, attract songbirds for a free snack. Cedar waxwings and robins are especially fond of them. A variety of butterflies also visit this Tree. Mourning clocks, question marks, and tawny emperors are just a few that use Hackberry as a host plant.

The Details

Common Hackberry should be called the 'Butterfly Tree' for the wealth of butterflies it supports. Perhaps the most charming is the Hackberry butterfly. This endearing little creature loves people (actually, it likes to sip the salts from our skin). You may feel a tickle while you're out working in the garden and find a Hackberry butterfly has landed on you!

How to Grow

Common Hackberry will grow fastest in full sun or light shade, in soil that is rich and moist. However, it will put up with poor growing conditions without complaint. Water it well during the first couple of years of establishment, and it should be able to fend for itself after that. A couple of issues that Hackberries sometimes face are witches' brooms (a proliferation of congested, twiggy growth) and Hackberry nipple gall (which appears as small bumps on the leaves). Neither of these is a serious problem. They are merely cosmetic afflictions that aren't real threats to your Tree.

More Info

Cold Tolerance/Hardiness Zone 3
Heat Tolerance/Hardiness Zone 9
Exposure Full Sun to Part Shade
Avg Mature Height 40-60'
Avg Mature Width 40-60'
Spacing 50-60'
Growth Rate Moderate
Leaf Color Green
Fall Leaf Color Yellow
Fruit Color Purple
Fruit Time Fall
Cary Award Winner No
PA Gold Medal Award No
Attractive Bark No
Attracts Birds Yes
Attracts Butterflies Yes
Attracts Hummingbirds No
Attracts Pollinators No
Deer Resistant Yes
Drought Tolerant Yes
Dry, Poor Soils Yes
Edible Fruit No
Fragrant No
Groundcover No
Hedge/Windbreak No
Native Yes
Salt Tolerance/Seashore Yes
Seasonal Cut Branches No
Shade Tolerance Yes
Showy Flowers No
Specimen No
Urban Conditions Yes
Utility Line Trees No
Wet Moist Soils Yes
Winter Interest No
Woodland Garden Yes
Decor/Craft Use No

Size Guide

Size Guide Scale

Scale

Size: A

Size A

Size: B

Size B

This graphic shows the approximate size and form of the Tree you are viewing.

Size A Trees:

5-6' tall, grown and delivered in a container. Although this size tree can be handled by one person its large container, stem and branching do not allow it to fit into a box.

Size B Trees:

7-8' tall, grown and delivered in a container. This tree is BIG! One strong person can pick this tree up but two would make it much easier. A truck or trailer will be needed to bring this native home to the birds.

Audubon® Common Hackberry Tree
Audubon® Common Hackberry Leaf
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 2430
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 1847
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 1846
Audubon® Common Hackberry Additional Product Shot 3082